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Believing These Six Myths About Field Service Management in the EV Industry Keeps You From Growing

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Author
Kaluri Shankar

The last decade has witnessed an outstanding push towards sustainable growth and against environmental pollution on all fronts. This has led to the recent uptake of electrical vehicles (EVs), positioned to be the keystone of the subsequent generation of transportation. However, like all new technologies, it’s important to demystify common doubts and questions before jumping to conclusions. Here are six myths about Field Service Management and how believing in them keeps you from growing in the EV Industry.


Electric cars take too long to charge
There’s nothing quicker than EV charging because it takes seconds to plug it in and then you wait for some time. The best time to charge it is overnight when you are planning to retire for the day. You get a full charge. If you’re charging at work or home, there’s no ‘downtime’ at all. You simply get on with your evening at home or morning in the office, then unplug and drive off when you’re done.

Using public charging takes up more of your time, but the solution is to use that time productively. For the 20 minutes it takes to complete an ultra-rapid charge, you can run a few errands. If you’re using slower-speed public charging, it’s a case of planning so that you plug in while you’re out shopping, at the gym, having lunch, etc.
With an efficient field force management system, EV companies can efficiently manage workflows and processes and integrate alarms for their customers as reminder alerts on their mobile devices for daily charging when the battery is nearing discharge. This is a proactive measure that helps EV companies stay one step ahead of competition.


EVs are no good for long-distance journeys
Admittedly, public charging facilities are not currently as prolific and visible as petrol stations, but the coverage will only build up. There’s no need to suffer from ‘range anxiety’ if you plan your journey and adjust your mindset to accept the need to have a pit stop on long journeys. This is an opportunity to have a comfort break, get something to drink or eat and catch up on calls and emails.

While the rapid charging network is increasing, auto manufacturers are also increasing battery range. Newer high-performance vehicles come with 80 kWh – 100 kWh (or even higher) batteries, which cover over 300 km and can recover around 80% of that range in under 30 minutes when using the latest high-power chargers.
With an efficient field force management system, EV companies can integrate geolocation services where customers can see the network of the charging stations from their devices and pre plan their long distance journeys. A few added features in the customer and workflow management helps EV companies stay one step ahead of competition.


EVs are as slow as golf carts
Electric vehicles are, in fact, generally quicker than their gasoline-powered counterparts. That’s because an electric motor generates 100% of its available torque instantly. When the driver of an EV pushes down on the accelerator pedal, the transition from stationary to speed is almost instantaneous. In fact, the top version of the Tesla Model S, when engaged in its so-called “ludicrous” mode, is one of the quickest production cars in the world at any price, with a 0-60 mph time clocked at a sudden 2.5 seconds.

With an efficient field force management system, EV companies can integrate their car stats to the customer’s devices so that customers can get alerts on their speed limit and driving history, and prove this myth incorrect.


Reducing air pollution
Sustainable transportation isn’t just about carbon reduction. Unlike EVs, which emit zero NOx emissions, ICE vehicles are a major cause of air pollution from NOx. Car batteries quickly lose performance and end up in landfill waste. A major difference between the lithium-ion batteries used in electric vehicles and mobile phones is that active thermal management is used to protect the long-term performance of EV batteries. This ensures that they are slow to degrade. Most manufacturers provide battery warranties of 7-8 years (or around 100k miles), but batteries should last longer than this and even outlive the lifespan of the vehicle.

Continual advances in battery technologies mean that degradation is reducing all the time and battery life should stretch well beyond warranty deadlines. Drivers can play their part in improving efficiency by avoiding draining the battery completely and then fully recharging. It’s typically recommended to charge to 80% at public rapid chargers to optimize the journey time spent charging, and never reduce the range to zero miles. Furthermore, EV batteries can have a second life for use in energy storage systems for buildings, and then ultimately be recycled (98% of components can be extracted and re-used).

How customers can charge their batteries efficiently is through an efficient Field Force Management Software that sends alerts to them to charge their batteries before it reaches 80%, so that its longevity is not compromised.


EVs are costly to maintain and repair
On the other hand, EVs cost less to keep running than ICE-powered vehicles. EVs don’t require regular oil changes or tune-ups, and there are far fewer moving parts to eventually fail and need replacing. EVs use a simple one-speed transmission and eschew items like spark plugs, valves, fuel tank, muffler/tailpipe, distributor, starter, clutch, drive belts, hoses, and a catalytic converter.

With an efficient field force management system, let your customers get a record of all the MIS of the electronics of the car on their devices so that they can check the efficiency of the vehicle at all times.


EVs are not practical to own without fully established infrastructure of public charging stations
Most electric vehicle charging is done at home or at work. There are about 20,000 charging stations up and running in the U.S. and you’ll usually find them at retail parking lots, public parking garages, and new-car dealerships in areas where EVs are most prevalent. Yes, the network will take time to set up in India, but it does not seem far away.
EV companies can integrate geolocation services where customers can see the network of the charging stations from their devices and pre plan their long distance journeys.

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